The EFM Feature

The evangelical public-relations guru released a major letter, reported as follows in the New York Times:

“I fully recognize some evangelicals take issue with me for supporting a Mormon for the office of president, and I respect their concerns,” he said in the letter. “Indeed, I had to deal with the same concerns in my own heart before offering to help Gov. Romney. But I concluded that I am more concerned that a candidate share my values than he shares my theology.”
He went on to say, “as a Southern Baptist evangelical and political conservatives, I am convinced I have more in common with most Mormons than I do with a liberal Southern Baptist, Methodist, Roman Catholic or a liberal from any other denomination or faith group.”
Mr. DeMoss even invoked his late friend, Jerry Falwell, who Mr. DeMoss described as his first employer, a second father and political mentor. The Moral Majority, created by Mr. Falwell, brought together, “evangelicals and like-minded Roman Catholics, Jews, and yes, Mormons.”
He said Falwell was among about 15 evangelicals who gathered at Mr. Romney’s home early in the campaign to quiz him on his views. He said Falwell told Mr. Romney that he did not have a problem with his Mormonism but wanted to know where he stood on the issues.
Mr. DeMoss also addressed skepticism about the authenticity of Mr. Romney’s relatively recent conversion from supporter of abortion rights to opponent, noting the whole point of the anti-abortion movement was to convince people to change their positions.

About Charles Mitchell

EFM's resident Yankee, Charles Mitchell, works in the non-profit arena in his native Pennsylvania. He and his wife, Charissa, live near the state capital of Harrisburg with their daughter, Adeline, and are members of a congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America.

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